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Exercise reduces women’s risk of developing cancer

27 September 2009 2 Comments
We’ve already seen how effective exercise is for reducing men’s risk of developing cancer http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=348, now it’s the ladies turn. Along term study of nearly 6,000 women “found that those who exercised the most had a 25 per cent lower chance of developing cancer than those who were the least active”.
This new research supports findings from late last year which found “women who carry out lots of vigorous exercise are approximately 30% less likely to develop breast cancer than those who don’t exercise vigorously”. That study followed over 30,000 women. It seems to have little to do with being overweight, that study focused on “normal-weight women”. Being sedentary ie not exercising, was shown to be a risk factor irrespective of how thin you may be.
In that study, “Vigorous activity was judged to include things like heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, heavy yard-work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise (running, fast jogging, competitive tennis; aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing).” I love it. Plenty of everyday things, chopping wood, fast dancing, heavy yard-work. No excuses girls, get out into that yard and chop down a tree and dance around really quickly!
But if you’re going to be exercising, beware burning the candle at both ends, you need to get plenty of sleep to recover. The study also found that “among younger, physically active women, those who slept less than seven hours a night had a 47 per cent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer than those who regularly got a good night’s rest.” I almost can’t believe that statistic, it’s HUGE!
All of this lends further support to the notion that a healthy lifestyle that is the key. We’ve seen this in the articles on how it specifically reduces the risk of breastWe’ve already seen how effective exercise is for reducing men’s risk of developing cancer http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=348, now it’s the ladies turn. Along term study of nearly 6,000 women “found that those who exercised the most had a 25 per cent lower chance of developing cancer than those who were the least active”.
This new research supports findings from late last year which found “women who carry out lots of vigorous exercise are approximately 30% less likely to develop breast cancer than those who don’t exercise vigorously”. That study followed over 30,000 women. It seems to have little to do with being overweight, that study focused on “normal-weight women”. Being sedentary ie not exercising, was shown to be a risk factor irrespective of how thin you may be.
In that study, “Vigorous activity was judged to include things like heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, heavy yard-work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise (running, fast jogging, competitive tennis; aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing).” I love it. Plenty of everyday things, chopping wood, fast dancing, heavy yard-work. No excuses girls, get out into that yard and chop down a tree and dance around really quickly!
But if you’re going to be exercising, beware burning the candle at both ends, you need to get plenty of sleep to recover. The study also found that “among younger, physically active women, those who slept less than seven hours a night had a 47 per cent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer than those who regularly got a good night’s rest.” I almost can’t believe that statistic, it’s HUGE!
All of this lends further support to the notion that a healthy lifestyle that is the key. We’ve seen this in the articles on how it specifically reduces the risk of breast cancer by about 40%, the benefits of a good nights sleep, the long term benefits of exercise,
References: http://bit.ly/q9n6l
http://bit.ly/lSu0d cancer by about 40%, the benefits of a good nights sleep, the long term benefits of exercise,
References: http://bit.ly/q9n6l
http://bit.ly/lSu0d

We’ve already seen how effective exercise is for reducing men’s risk of developing cancer http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=348, now it’s the ladies turn. Along term study of nearly 6,000 women “found that those who exercised the most had a 25 per cent lower chance of developing cancer than those who were the least active”.

This new research supports findings from late last year which found “women who carry out lots of vigorous exercise are approximately 30% less likely to develop breast cancer than those who don’t exercise vigorously“. That study followed over 32,000 women. It seems to have little to do with being overweight, that study focused on “normal-weight women”. Being sedentary ie not exercising, was shown to be a risk factor irrespective of how thin you may be.

In that study, “Vigorous activity was judged to include things like heavy housework (scrubbing floors, washing windows, heavy yard-work, digging, chopping wood) and strenuous sports or exercise (running, fast jogging, competitive tennis; aerobics, bicycling on hills, and fast dancing).” I love it. Plenty of everyday things, chopping wood, fast dancing, heavy yard-work. No excuses girls, get out into that yard and chop down a tree and dance around really quickly!

But if you’re going to be exercising, beware burning the candle at both ends, you need to get plenty of sleep to recover. The study also found that “among younger, physically active women, those who slept less than seven hours a night had a 47 per cent higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer than those who regularly got a good night’s rest.” I almost can’t believe that statistic, it’s HUGE!

All of this lends further support to the notion that a healthy lifestyle that is the key. We’ve seen this in the articles on how it specifically reduces the risk of breast cancer by about 40% (http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=377), the benefits of a good nights sleep (http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=114), the long term benefits of exercise (http://www.chrisjonesosteo.com.au/?p=193).

In summary, 2 studies, over 38,000 women, compelling evidence.

References: http://bit.ly/q9n6l

http://bit.ly/lSu0d

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