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Healthy Bones, Healthy Body

26 July 2010 No Comment
2 questions I am routinely asked are whether the fundamental principles of Osteopathy have ever been proven scientifically (ok, I made that up) , and whether I can do a treatment that will help people lose weight (I didn’t make that one up, I work in the Eastern Suburbs after all). A new article in Scientific American will help answer both.
“Osteopathy, that’s all about bones, right?”. Well, kind of. Yes, the prefix “osteo-” pertains to bones. And the suffix “-pathy” pertains to disease. The founder of Osteopathy, Andrew Taylor Still (legend) chose this term because he believed that the structure of the body affected the health of the body. It didn’t start off as a back pain/neck pain/headaches/sports injuries modality, the original Osteopaths were genuine alternatives to seeing a doctor. They manipulated the body to improve its ability to heal itself from illness and disease.
The article in Scientific American cites the results of 2 studies that show a link between the activity of bone-building and bone-resorbing cells with blood sugar levels and energy metabolism. In other words, if there is a problem with the health of the bone, this can impact your metabolism (and vice versa). A classic example of this would be the high percentage of women with type 1 diabetes who have relatively decreased bone mass, increased fracture risk, and delayed fracture healing compared with healthy women without diabetes (Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/465736)
According to the author, “The studies suggest that the skeleton may be an important regulator of whole-body energy metabolism”. It’s great validation for the principles of Osteopathy, and it means I won’t be so quick to laugh off the idea of a treatment that could help you lose cellulite…

Two questions I am routinely asked are whether the fundamental principles of Osteopathy have ever been proven scientifically (ok, I made that up), and whether I can do a treatment that will help people lose weight (I didn’t make that one up, I worked in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney after all). A new article in Scientific American will help answer both.

“Osteopathy, that’s all about bones, right?”. Well, kind of. Yes, the prefix “osteo-” pertains to bones. And the suffix “-pathy” pertains to disease. The founder of Osteopathy, Andrew Taylor Still (legend) chose this term because he believed that the structure of the body affected the health of the body. Osteopathy didn’t start off as a back pain/neck pain/headaches/sports injuries modality, the original Osteopaths were genuine alternatives to seeing a doctor. They manipulated the body to improve its ability to heal itself from illness and disease.

The article in Scientific American cites the results of 2 studies that show a link between the activity of bone-building and bone-resorbing cells with blood sugar levels and energy metabolism. In other words, if there is a problem with the health of the bone, this can impact your metabolism (and vice versa). A classic example of this would be the high percentage of women with type 1 diabetes who have relatively decreased bone mass, increased fracture risk, and delayed fracture healing compared with healthy women without diabetes.*

According to the author, “The studies suggest that the skeleton may be an important regulator of whole-body energy metabolism”. It’s great validation for the principles of Osteopathy, and it means I won’t be so quick to laugh off the idea of a treatment that could help you lose cellulite…

*(Source:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/465736)

Photo Source: http://farm1.static.flickr.com/81/241873015_d2d0337b83.jpg

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